October 17, 2014
Networked Bodies: Digital Performance Weekender | Watermans 7-9 November

watermans

I’m pleased to announce that I will be exhibiting three works as part of Networked Bodies: Digital Performance Weekender at Watermans from the 7th to 9th of November. One of the works, The Distinction Between Here and There, Now and Then will be a gallery premiere and another A network of people who attended an exhibition and contributed to the creation of this work will be exhibited and open to participation for the last time.

The event which is all at once an exhibition, performances and symposium has an interesting line-up. If your in London try to pop along over the course of the weekend, I hope to be there Friday and Saturday so say hello.

The following is the event statement:

Networks are at the heart of how we live today. Networks generate transnational zones of action, bring together communities, circulate knowledge and information, expand spheres of influence, contaminate ideas, germinate exchanges, foster innovation, and facilitate distribution of power. However, networks are unfairly distributed and closely monitored. Geopolitical injustices and dominant political and economic forces mean that networks can foster segregation, facilitate hyper-centralized forms of citizen surveillance and control, fragment living space and experience. These developments of the network society generate social tensions, which invest the task of understanding networks in their many manifestations –including cultural ones– with social and political urgency.

Networks, despite many past promises of disembodiment and internationalism through the obsolescence of both bodies and geographical boundaries – promises now widely perceived themselves as obsolete – are still experienced by subjects that remain both embodied and geographically situated (Cohen, 2012: 11) As Cohen argues, not only are networks firmly connected to material bodies and physical geographies, but they also play “an increasingly significant role in constructing embodied experience” (ibid), by both empowering and configuring the “networked self” (ibid: 12).

In Networked Bodies at Watermans we want to explore networked performance practices with a view to considering how they transform live (embodied, disembodied and trans-bodied) performance practices. We are keen to consider the many, increasingly well documented, exciting possibilities these present to live performance, as well as their potential downsides. Speaking for the devil (so to speak), we ask: do these practices raise any ethical concerns through the use of surveillance and control, fragmentation of space and experience, alienation or even exploitation of their participants? Networked Bodies will aim to look beyond shiny appearances and into the –occasionally dirty– folds of the networks (and the bodies).

Curated by Maria Chatzichristodoulou (aka Maria X) and Irini Papadimitriou, the full programme for the event is available online here.

Posted by: Garrett @ 2:02 pm
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April 24, 2014
Out of Office

out-of-office

If you’re in Cardiff before the 30th of April, it’s worth going along to see Matthew Britton’s curatorial project Out of Office at Arcade Cardiff:

Out of Office is a micro curatorial platform that utilises the auto-reply feature that is present on most email accounts as a method of distributing art. I wish to suggest an even more intimate way of distributing and viewing online works, one which is primarily in the comfort of your own mailbox.

In order to view the work you need only send an email to the assigned email address and wait for the auto reply.

The project features works by: Matthew Britton, Emilie Gervais, Constant Dullaart, Kim Asendorf, Jonas Lund, Sebastian Schmieg, Matthew Williamson, Johannes P Osterhoff, Naomi Heath, Shia LaBeouf, Nastja Säde Rönkkö, Luke Turner, Winnie Soon and Susan Scarlata. If you’re nowhere near Cardiff the works can also be accessed directly from the project website.

Posted by: Garrett @ 5:24 pm
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December 17, 2013
Two orchestra-like works

Two orchestra like projects, one highly polished and the other a work produced as part of a workshop but equally as interesting.

computerOrchestra_blue

ComputerOrchestra_interface_3

The Computer Orchestra (images above, video below) by Simon de Diesbach, Jonas Lacôte and Laura Perrenoud, students at ECAL (Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne) is:

a crowdsourcing platform that allows users to create and conduct their own orchestra. They can choose to upload their own music or download samples to integrate into their formation. With a simple interface, they assign the chosen samples to each post. They can also arrange detection zones, that allow them to order the “musicians” to play, using various gestures. Once their orchestra is configured, they can direct it with the movements of their body.

Screen Shot 2013-12-17 at 15.14.19

Neo-Aula (image above, video below) is a interactive sequencer consisting of 25 networked computers and a web based interface to interact with them. This work seems to have been the outcome of a workshop lead by mobilitylab as part of a digital week at the Universite of Vic in Spain.

What’s interesting about both of these projects is seeing a lab of computers within a university as a source of inspiration to create a work. This is most obvious in Neo-Aula which has been subtitled “hacking the classroom”.

Posted by: Garrett @ 3:32 pm
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September 22, 2013
The work of Amalia Pica

The following are works by Amalia Pica whose practice focuses on communication, its forms and signals. The following quote is from the Guardian’s review of her work:

art and life are characterised by gaps and missed signals. What interests Pica is the distance between sender and receiver, the ways we misunderstand or misremember. She addresses the problem of art speaking to people – like the time she used Semaphore flag code to broadcast gobbledygook in the middle of nowhere.

wall-could-talk

Above: If these walls could talk

shutter-telegraph

Above: Shutter telegraph (as seen on TV)

babble

Above: Babble, Blabber, Chatter, Gibber, Jabber, Patter, Prattle, Rattle, Yammer, Yada Yada Yada

wireless-way

Above: The wireless way in low visibility (recreation of the first system for non cable transmission, as seen on TV)

radar

Above: Acoustic Radar in Cardboard

metaphor-2

Above: Sorry for the metaphor #2

There is an interesting review on Art Agenda of Amalia Pica’s exhibition, Low Visibility, in Berlin this summer.

Posted by: Garrett @ 4:50 pm
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July 11, 2013
Flood Helmet

flood-helmet

The Flood Helmet by Kian-Peng Ong:

is a mobile device that visualises possible future flood scenarios based on the user’s physical location. The flood level in the helmet is determined by the elevation height of the land that the user is standing through gps coordinates inputs and gives users a sensory and experiential exploration of their surrounding areas and the future it might hold.

Posted by: Garrett @ 2:08 pm
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