October 17, 2014
Networked Bodies: Digital Performance Weekender | Watermans 7-9 November

watermans

I’m pleased to announce that I will be exhibiting three works as part of Networked Bodies: Digital Performance Weekender at Watermans from the 7th to 9th of November. One of the works, The Distinction Between Here and There, Now and Then will be a gallery premiere and another A network of people who attended an exhibition and contributed to the creation of this work will be exhibited and open to participation for the last time.

The event which is all at once an exhibition, performances and symposium has an interesting line-up. If your in London try to pop along over the course of the weekend, I hope to be there Friday and Saturday so say hello.

The following is the event statement:

Networks are at the heart of how we live today. Networks generate transnational zones of action, bring together communities, circulate knowledge and information, expand spheres of influence, contaminate ideas, germinate exchanges, foster innovation, and facilitate distribution of power. However, networks are unfairly distributed and closely monitored. Geopolitical injustices and dominant political and economic forces mean that networks can foster segregation, facilitate hyper-centralized forms of citizen surveillance and control, fragment living space and experience. These developments of the network society generate social tensions, which invest the task of understanding networks in their many manifestations –including cultural ones– with social and political urgency.

Networks, despite many past promises of disembodiment and internationalism through the obsolescence of both bodies and geographical boundaries – promises now widely perceived themselves as obsolete – are still experienced by subjects that remain both embodied and geographically situated (Cohen, 2012: 11) As Cohen argues, not only are networks firmly connected to material bodies and physical geographies, but they also play “an increasingly significant role in constructing embodied experience” (ibid), by both empowering and configuring the “networked self” (ibid: 12).

In Networked Bodies at Watermans we want to explore networked performance practices with a view to considering how they transform live (embodied, disembodied and trans-bodied) performance practices. We are keen to consider the many, increasingly well documented, exciting possibilities these present to live performance, as well as their potential downsides. Speaking for the devil (so to speak), we ask: do these practices raise any ethical concerns through the use of surveillance and control, fragmentation of space and experience, alienation or even exploitation of their participants? Networked Bodies will aim to look beyond shiny appearances and into the –occasionally dirty– folds of the networks (and the bodies).

Curated by Maria Chatzichristodoulou (aka Maria X) and Irini Papadimitriou, the full programme for the event is available online here.

Posted by: Garrett @ 2:02 pm
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July 11, 2014
Remote Encounters: a report about networking practitioners

digicult

A short(ish) article on the Remote Encounters conference and Liminalities journal special issue titled Remote Encounters: a report about networking practitioners has been published on Digicult.it.

Posted by: Garrett @ 4:08 pm
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May 14, 2014
Liminalities 10.1 now online

networkresearch-10-1

The journal of performance studies, Liminalities issue 10.1, a special issue guest edited by Garrett Lynch (University of South Wales) and Rea Dennis (Deakin University), is now online. The contributions to this issue have been compiled from the outcomes of the international conference Remote Encounters: Connecting Bodies, Collapsing Spaces and Temporal Ubiquity in Networked Performance held at the University of South Wales on the 11th and 12th of April 2013. The conference brought together artists and scholars with a joint interest in using networks as a means to enhance or create a wide variety of performance arts. The direct url to the issue is below, please do forward to your networks/colleagues etc.

Liminalities issue 10.1 – http://liminalities.net/10-1/

Posted by: Garrett @ 12:11 pm
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December 1, 2013
How to make a Bomb by IOCOSE

make-a-bomb

IOCOSE’s A Crowded Apocalypse uses crowdsourcing as a means of generating and developing tactics against conspiracy theories. The Italian artists’ group:

has commissioned a series of micro tasks, each of them being almost completely meaningless. However, when put together, the tasks collectively contributed to generate a series of potential paranoias. The results have been commissioned, collected, organised and exhibited by the artist group, showing the result of a process of mechanical and unemotional involvement of the participants in the process of writing and protesting against conspiratory narratives.

One of the works in this series of “micro tasks” or works is How to make a Bomb (view here on YouTube), a step-by-step guide on how to assemble a bomb. The guide is a playlist on YouTube, each step of the guide one of 28 videos hosted on different accounts. Viewed separately the content of each video is harmless or meaningless. Viewed together as the full playlist the videos give a set of lethal instructions that without a doubt would be in breach of YouTube policy (and almost any other online provider) yet as a distributed guide prove difficult to censor and delete.

Posted by: Garrett @ 4:53 pm
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September 22, 2013
The work of Amalia Pica

The following are works by Amalia Pica whose practice focuses on communication, its forms and signals. The following quote is from the Guardian’s review of her work:

art and life are characterised by gaps and missed signals. What interests Pica is the distance between sender and receiver, the ways we misunderstand or misremember. She addresses the problem of art speaking to people – like the time she used Semaphore flag code to broadcast gobbledygook in the middle of nowhere.

wall-could-talk

Above: If these walls could talk

shutter-telegraph

Above: Shutter telegraph (as seen on TV)

babble

Above: Babble, Blabber, Chatter, Gibber, Jabber, Patter, Prattle, Rattle, Yammer, Yada Yada Yada

wireless-way

Above: The wireless way in low visibility (recreation of the first system for non cable transmission, as seen on TV)

radar

Above: Acoustic Radar in Cardboard

metaphor-2

Above: Sorry for the metaphor #2

There is an interesting review on Art Agenda of Amalia Pica’s exhibition, Low Visibility, in Berlin this summer.

Posted by: Garrett @ 4:50 pm
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